The Sweat of Their Brow: Occupations in the 1800s

Zachary Chastain (author)

Publisher: Mason Crest ISBN: 9781422296820

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Description

America in the 1800s was a very hardworking society. Early in the century, farmers, craftsmen, and housewives worked very much the way they had for centuries - by their own physical labor and the sweat of their brow. The growing industrial economy brought millions of workers, people leaving their farms and new immigrants, into the factories and workshops of America, where the work was hard, the hours were long, and the pay was low. Women and children made up a large percentage of the industrial workforce, and conditions were often miserable and dangerous. Meanwhile, a small class of industrialists built vast fortunes. As the century progressed, improved technology, workers rights legislation, and the rise of trade unions helped to alleviate some of the misery of American workers, but for much of the 1800s, the lives of an average working class person was one of hard toil, limited opportunities, and the constant threat of poverty.

Reading Level
Lexile
Fountas Pinnell Guided Reading
ATOS
DRA
Categories
Genre
History Social Issues
Interest Age
Ages 13+
Grade
7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade
Subject
Social Studies
Language
English (US)
Fiction/Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction
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