Cornmeal and Cider: Food and Drink in the 1800s

Zachary Chastain (author)

Publisher: Mason Crest ISBN: 9781422296936

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Description

The farmers, workers, and pioneers of America in the 1800s were nourished by a tradition of hearty, down home cooking that is still a part of our national cuisine - New England baked beans, roast beef, turkey, corn on the cob, and pumpkin pies. With roots in the British Isles, and with important contributions from Native American food plants and cooking techniques, American food and drink quality and seasonal variety was vastly improved during the 1800s by new technologies in transportation, food storage, hygiene, and preservation, growing national and world markets, and not least the delicious ethnic cuisines of new immigrant groups. Hungry for innovation, quality, and economy, Americans in the 1800s became the best fed nation in the history of the world!

Reading Level
Lexile
Fountas Pinnell Guided Reading
ATOS
DRA
Categories
Genre
Cultural/Diversity History Science & Technology
Interest Age
Ages 13+
Grade
7th Grade 8th Grade 9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade
Subject
Science Social Studies
Language
English (US)
Fiction/Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction
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